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CMX-200...
Photo of ASR-33
Teletype Model ASR-33
Released in 1971, the CMX-200 was the auto-assembly half of the CMX-600. It wasn't intended for interactive editing. The CMX-200 had a minimum of commands, and was controlled by an ASR-33 Teletype. The Teletype was also used to load the edit lists produced by the CMX-600.



CMX-300...
Photo of CMX-300
CMX-300 Edit Suite
 
VT-05 Screen and Keyboard CMX-300 Console
(DEC VT-05)
Often after a program was conformed using the CMX-200, fixes, or minor changes might be required. The CMX-200 was of limited use in making these changes.
 
So in 1972, the 300 was born as CMX's first online editor.
 
The CMX-300 was "THE" editor of its day.
 
It handled edit lists, controlled four VTR's (generally 2" Quad VTR's) and included a simple audio mixer and video switcher (with wipes and keys).
 
Many of the feature of today's linear editors were first developed on the CMX-300.



CMX-400...
The CMX-400 was designed for offline use. It was the basic CMX-300 hardware and software, but was used with IVC 870 1" helical scan VTR's.
 


CMX-340...
Keyboard
CMX-340 Console
Released in 1976, the 340 continued the CMX tradition of linear editors, the major innovation in the CMX-340 was the introduction of the Intelligent Interfaces or I2 (pronounced eye-square) concept.
 
This allowed the user the freedom to use any combination of VTR's in the edit session.


I2...
Photo of CMX I2
CMX Intelligent Interface
The I2 was an elegant solution to a major problem. Most of the available VTR's required parallel control, and external time code readers. The same was true for the video switcher and audio mixers.

To deal with these hardware differences, each I2 was designed to control a specific VTR or switcher.
 
But, the communications with the CMX-340 executive was standardized. Thus, to the edit system, all machines looked and acted the same.
 
A brilliant solution to a knotty problem.

 


 
Memories...

CMX Class   CMX Class

School days at CMX in Sunnyvale (October 1981)
Jim Cottle, Sadiq Mohamed, Jay Ankeney, Mark Kaplan and out of frame, Christin Hardman (1952-2005)  


 
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 CMX Systems
 635 Vaqueros Avenue
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   3303 Scott Boulevard
 CMX Systems
 A Division of Orrox Corporation
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 Santa Clara, CA 95050